Teaching

At King’s College London, I am primarily responsible for teaching two modules (courses). First, I convene and teach a module titled Social and Political Analysis of Emerging Economies in the fall term, which is intended for first year college undergraduates. Second, every spring I teach a graduate level module titled Comparative Public Policy Analysis, which introduces students to public policy-making processes from a comparative perspective, with an emphasis on the emerging economies.


 

Social and Political Analysis of Emerging Economies

This is an introductory level course exposing undergraduate students to political science and sociology theory, method, and empirical analysis. Students will learn topics ranging from political philosophy, to democratization, comparative political economy, states and development in the emerging economies. This module is intended to give students a strong theoretical and empirical background on these issues, while preparing them for advanced study in a particular theme.

Click here to download the PDF


 

Comparative Public Policy Analysis

The aim of this course is to provide students with a strong foundation in the theoretical frameworks associated with comparative policy analysis, the comparative methodology involved, as well as the lessons that can be learned from emerging economies. The first half of the course will focus more on learning what comparative public policy is, the theories associated with this kind of approach as well as the method for selecting and comparing case studies. Towards the end of the course, students will read several case study examples from emerging economies in Latin America, South Asia, and Africa, and to what extent the theoretical frameworks learned in the course do – or do not – help to explain and predict policy outcomes. We will close the course by discussing the extent to which policy implementation and designs matter in explaining policy outcomes as well as how and if formal and informal institutions matter in the emerging economies.

Click here to download the PDF